Japanese Desserts

Japanese Desserts

Japanese meals have graced many occasions with their unbeatable culture-centered nature. Essentially, although most of these delicacies are not consumed by spoons, they have successfully cultivated a no-nonsense way of functioning that most people seem to respond to.

With the delicacies comes the desserts, commonly referred to as the ”after meals”. In Japan, the dessert recipes can easily be traditional affairs depending on the nature of the food accompanying the main meal. These include but not limited to plant and nuts, local fruits, foreign foodstuffs or even a combination of the three. Most of these desserts are highly defined by regional variations of foods like the omiyage and meibutsu versions for tourists. All in all, a keen look at the Japanese desserts reflect that most of them a made from ingredients and constituents like mocha, nuts, fruits, azuki beans among others.

Japanese Desserts

First and foremost, to begin with, the mocha is a great and mouth-watering presence of most Japanese desserts. Mochi, however, is not used directly as a dessert. What most chefs do is that they make ball-like ”dangos” from mochi. These dangos are dipped in a flavoring immediately they are withdrawn from a skewer. Over the years, this dessert has successfully navigated the protocol for international meal in the east by preaching a sermon every consumer would like to hear.

The next dessert in our list are the sumptuous wagachi japanese desserts. Although expensive but more tasty than the dangos, the wagachi comes in dozens of variations. Essentially, there is no one type of them. Made from azuki, nuts and fruits, the wagachi has built its name as an impeccable type of a Japanese dessert that you can never afford to look down on. One more thing, as a complement to this sweet dessert, the green tea is served.

Finally we have the sakuramochi. This is a sweet but rather pinky type of mochi rice. The sakuramochi is entirely covered with a cherry blossom and filled with a brown paste of beans. However, unlike the other japanese desserts, sakuramochi is not consumed in any occasion. It is solely used to grace the girl’s day (known as hinamatysuri) in Japan every March on 3rd. You can now award yourself a Japanese dash of sophistication when dining.

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